Christians, Muslims, and Jews Copy Euclid

The Elements of “Euclid” (4th century BCE) was the most influential work of classical mathematics in the medieval world.


EUCLID, ELEMENTS OF GEOMETRY, IN ARABIC

1238, 9 3/4 x 7 in. (24.8 x 17.8 cm), MS. Thurston 11, fol. 35a

The "Elements" of Euclid (4th century BCE) was the most influential work of classical mathematics in the medieval world, widely studied by Byzantine, Islamic, and later European scholars. It was several times translated into Arabic; this manuscript is the version of Ishaq ibn Hunayn (died c. 910), revised by Thabit ibn Qurrah (died 901).

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rblevow
September 15, 2012

I'm wondering which proposition this is. The diagram looks much like that for Proposition 27 of...
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EUCLID, ELEMENTS OF GEOMETRY, IN HEBREW

Scribe: Abraham ben Judah of Crete, Candia (Crete), 1374–75, 9 x 6 1/4 in. (22.9 x 15.8 cm), MS. Hunt. 561, fols. 38b–39a

In the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries many Arabic versions of Greek mathematical books were translated into Hebrew. This manuscript contains the Hebrew translation completed in 1270 by Moses ibn Tibbon (active in Provence, 1240–83).



EUCLID, ELEMENTS OF GEOMETRY, IN LATIN

13th century, 8 1/4 x 5 1/8 in. (21 x 13 cm), MS. Savile 19, fols. 26v–27r

In the twelfth century the Arabic text of Euclid’s "Elements" was translated into Latin (though a Latin translation direct from the Greek already existed). Versions are ascribed to Herman of Carinthia, Adelard of Bath, and Gerard of Cremona. The many different renderings were reworked numerous times, together with detailed annotations and commentaries by generations of scholars.